This was a losing week for government-issued currencies as well as stocks and bonds, but mixed for commodities. The free market currency Bitcoin made the largest gains, rising 8.6%, while crude oil and gold stocks saw the largest declines, falling 4.8% and 4.7% respectively. Platinum bounced back, recouping almost all of the prior week's losses.

As mentioned above, while Bitcoin was surging, all of the government-issued currencies were falling, led by the Japanese Yen, which dropped 1.7%, and the Canadian Dollar, which fell 1.4%. The least weak currency was the Euro, which fell 0.3%. Bonds switched gears and showed a shorter time preference this week, with the long term TLT falling 2.7%, while SHY lost 0.6% and USD cash lost 0.5%.

Stocks were all lower, led by the HUI gold stocks, which fell 4.7%. The S&P 500 Index dropped 1.2%, while Europe and Japan had the least weakness; the Nikkei 225 was off 0.2%, and the Euro STOXX index was 0.3% lower.

Coffee and copper were very strong this week, rising 5.4% and 4.5% respectively. The weakest commodities were crude oil, which fell 4.8%, and palladium, which slowed it's rate of descent, dropping 1.0%. Silver ended the week unchanged.

As mentioned above, platinum bounced back after setting a new all-time low of 22.8 grams in the prior week, ending this week at 23.75 grams/oz. I continue to see this as an excellent buying opportunity for platinum, which is trading at a 24% discount to gold, as opposed to its historical average 43% premium.

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This was a losing week for currencies and commodities, but mixed for stocks and bonds. Gold stocks made the largest gains, rising 7.0%, while palladium once again saw the largest declines, falling another 4.7%. Platinum also fell, dropping 1.8% to close at a new all-time low of 22.77 grams/oz.

Among the currencies, Bitcoin had the largest loss, giving up 2.4%, or bit more than half of the prior week's gains. The Euro was close behind, falling 2.3%. The least weak currency was the Chinese Yuan, which fell 0.9%. Bonds showed a longer time preference this week, with the long term TLT gaining 0.2%, while SHY lost 1.0% and USD cash lost 1.1%.

Major stock markets once again split along geographical lines, with the US stocks falling while Asia rose. The Dow Jones Industrials dropped 1.1%, and the Nikkei 225 gained 0.9%. The Euro STOXX index was unchanged.

Every commodity in the list fell this week, led by palladium, off 4.7%, and cotton, down 3.2%. The least weak commodities were crude oil, down 0.1%, and coffee, which closed 0.7% lower.

Copper and Platinum continued their declines, falling 2.1% and 1.8% respectively. As mentioned above, platinum closed the week at a new all-time low of 22.8 grams, but it recovered smartly on Monday and Tuesday and is currently trading at 23.5 grams (about where it was 2 weeks ago). I continue to see this as an excellent buying opportunity for the white metal, which is much rarer than gold, has numerous industrial and jewelry uses, and historically trades at a significant premium to gold – as opposed to its current 24% discount.

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This was a mixed week in all asset categories, but much less violent than last week, with the largest gains and losses in the commodities. Cotton and coffee made the biggest gains, rising 5.9% and 5.6% respectively, while palladium and platinum saw the largest declines, falling 4.2% and 3.8%.

Among the currencies, Bitcoin once again made the largest gains, rising 4.1%. The Chinese Renminbi was the weakest currency, giving back 1.1% of the prior week's 5.5% gain. The strongest government-issued currency was the Canadian Dollar, which gained 1.1%. Short term treasuries rose 0.5% while long term treasury bonds lost 1.2%; once again, both were out-performed by USD cash, which closed 0.6% higher.

Major stock markets were little changed this week, with the weakest being the the Euro STOXX (off 0.8%) and the strongest being the HUI gold stocks, which gained 0.7%. The S&P 500 dropped 0.4%, while the Dow Jones Industrials were unchanged.

After last week's big drop, silver recovered 1.4% this week. As previously mentioned, platinum and palladium weren't so lucky; platinum closed the week at 23.1 grams/oz, just 1.5% above it's all-time low. Copper gave back most of last week's gains, falling 2.5%, while crude oil continued it's rally, adding another 1.6%.

From 2011 to 2015, stocks were in a mighty uptrend, with the DJIA rising from 184 grams to a high of 523 grams. In 2016, however, they have broken down through that uptrend line, and have closed below their 36 month moving average in each of the last two months. This is a strong sign that stocks are now entering a prolonged downtrend, and any extended rallies will be selling opportunities. I would recommend taking profits and positioning for the bear market that we are now entering. Cash (in the form of physical gold) should be a large part of any portfolio. For potential gains without counter-party risks, physical platinum looks very attractive at these prices. Silver will eventually be a bargain as well, but it is still 40% above it's lows, and too risky for me at this point.

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This was a very strong week for everything except precious metals and gold stocks. Crude oil made the biggest gains, rising 8.5%, while gold stocks saw the largest decline, falling 9.4%.

Among the currencies, Bitcoin once again rose the most, adding 6.5%. The Chinese Renminbi rose 5.5%, and even the weakest currency, the Japanese Yen, gained 2.6%. Short term treasuries rose 4.9% while long term treasury bonds gained 2.5%; neither one could match plain, old USD cash stuffed into your mattress, however: that rose 5.1%.

Major stock markets were all higher this week, led by the Nikkei, which gained 5.2%; the Dow Jones Industrials and the Euro STOXX each added 4.7%. Only gold stocks were lower, and were they ever! The HUI dropped 9.4% to close below its 200 day moving average for the first time in 8 months.

Commodities were divided into two camps: precious metals, and everything else. All of the precious metals declined, led by silver, which fell 5.9%. Crude oil continued its outstanding performance, rising 8.5% on top of last week's 9.8% gain. Copper rose 3.4%, while cotton and coffee gained 3.4% and 2.6% respectively.

I would suggest that you take advantage of these updrafts to take profits and move some of your assets to the safety of gold. I don't know how long they will last, but once the US election is complete the fed will take the safety off of its monetary machine gun, and with Italian and German "too big to fail" banks on the very brink of failing, I think this is the time to be moving calmly but forcefully towards the exits – before everyone else smells the smoke and panics.

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Currencies and bonds rose this week, while stocks and commodities were mixed. The strongest asset class was crude oil, which gained 9.8%, while the weakest was silver, which lost 1.2%.

Among the currencies, Bitcoin made the largest gains, rising 2.4%. The USD and EUR rose 1.2% each, and even the weakest currencies, the CNY and CAD, gained 0.8%. Short term treasuries tracked the dollar's 1.2% gain while long term treasury bonds gained 1.7%.

Stock markets reversed course this week, with US markets rising and Euro and Japanese markets falling; the Dow Jones Industrials and the S&P 500 added 1.5% and 1.4% respectively. The Japanese Nikkei lost 0.8%, while the Euro STOXX fell 0.6%.

Both the strongest and weakest asset classes were commodities. Crude oil dominated, rising 9.8%, followed by palladium, which gained 5.8%. Silver fell 1.2% and platinum lost 0.8%.

Many commodities have recently made new all-time lows, including wheat, copper, and uranium. The latest IMO Food Price Index also set a new all-time low. Financial markets may be inflating (especially when priced in government-issued currencies), but real goods are priced at or below depression-era levels. And even stocks, like the Dow Jones Industrials, have now closed for 2 months below their 36 month moving average, which in the past has been a reliable indicator of a long-term bear market. This is the time to get defensive, holding cash in the form of physical gold and lightening up on speculative currency and equity positions.

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Currencies, bonds, and US stocks fell this week, while precious metals, gold stocks, and European stocks rose. The strongest asset class was palladium, which gained 3.4%, while the weakest was Bitcoin, which lost 3.0%.

The USD was the weakest government-issued currency, off 2.3%. The Japanese Yen was the "least weak" currency, falling 1.2%. Short term treasuries tracked the dollar's 2.3% decline while long term treasury bonds fell 0.8%.

Stock markets were lower in the US; the Dow Jones Industrials and the S&P 500 were off 1.5% and 1.1% respectively. The Japanese Nikkei rose 0.2%, while the Euro STOXX gained 1.2%.

Commodities were mostly higher, led by the precious metals. Palladium made the largest gains, rising 3.4%. Silver gained 2.4%, while platinum added 1.9% to close at 24.5 grams per ounce. Crude oil also had a good week, rising 1.0%. The only falling commodities were copper, down 0.4%, and coffee, off 0.3%.

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This week was mostly lower for bonds and equities, but mostly higher for currencies and commodities. The strongest asset class was Bitcoin, which rose 7.8%, while the weakest asset class was gold stocks, which fell 4.4%.

The Chinese Yuan was the weakest currency, off 1.8%. The Japanese Yen was the strongest government-issued currency, gaining 0.6%. The USD lost 0.5%, and long term treasury bonds fell 2.7%.

Stock markets were mostly lower, led by the HUI gold stock index, which dropped 4.4%. The Dow Jones Industrials and the S&P 500 were off 2.7% and 2.8% respectively. The Japanese Nikkei was the only rising stock index, gaining 0.9%.

Commodities were all higher except for coffee, which fell 0.6%. Silver made the largest gains, rising 3.0%. Crude oil gained 2.8%, while platinum rose 1.5% to close at 25.1 grams per ounce.

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Another mixed week, with currencies and bonds mostly lower, equities higher, and commodities both mixed and volatile. The largest gains were in coffee, which rose 4.1%, while the largest losses were in crude oil, which pulled back 7.1%.

The Chinese Yuan was the only rising currency, up 0.7%. The JPY fell the furthest, losing 3.2%. The USD lost 0.4%.

Stock markets were all higher, led by the Euro STOXX, which rose 2.1%. The Dow Jones Industrials rose 0.1%, but remain below their 36 month moving average.

Metals were all lower except for silver, which was unchanged at 0.44 grams per ounce.

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Another mixed week, in many ways a reversal of last week's trends. Currencies were mostly higher, while stocks were higher in the US, but lower in Japan and Europe. Commodities were volatile: crude oil again made the biggest gains this week, rising 9.5%, and the largest losses were once again in cotton, down 3.3%.

The only falling currencies were the Chinese Yuan, which lost 0.5%, and Bitcoin, which fell 1.7%. The biggest currency gains were in the Euro, which rose 1.9%. Bonds were mixed, with the short term SHY gaining 0.3% (a bit less than USD cash, which rose 0.4%) while the long term TLT fell 0.6%, giving back all of the previous week's gains.

Aside from the gold stocks, equities were little changed. In the US, the S&P 500 gained 0.4% and the Dow rose 0.3%, While the Euro STOXX fell 0.4%, and the Japanese Nikkei 225 lost 0.3%. Gold stocks pulled back this week, losing 3.2% to close at 6.2 grams – just below its long-term resistance.

Crude oil, which rose 5.5% last week, rocketed 9.5% higher this week. The week's largest losses were once again in cotton, off 3.3%. Metals were mixed, with platinum falling 3.1% and silver dropping 1.9%, while palladium rose 2.9% and copper gained 1.7%.

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Another mixed week, with currencies mostly lower, and stocks lower in the US, but higher in Japan and Europe. Commodities were volatile: crude oil made the biggest gains this week, rising 5.5%, while the largest losses were in cotton, off 8.7%, and coffee, down 4.8%.

The only rising currencies were the Chinese Yuan, which gained 1.6%, and Bitcoin, which rose 1.0%. The biggest currency losses were in the JPY, which fell 1.2%. Bonds were mixed, with the the short term SHY losing 0.8% (roughly tracking USD cash) while the long term TLT gained 0.6%.

Equities were split between the US, where the DJIA dropped 0.7% and the S&P 500 fell 0.8%, and the Euro STOXX, which gained 2.2%, and the Japanese Nikkei 225, which rose 2.8%. Gold stocks rose 0.6% to close at 6.41 grams, right on their long term resistance line. The HUI is now up 86% from one year ago, putting gold stocks and Bitcoin neck and neck as the best performing asset classes over that period.

Commodities were also mixed. Crude oil, which dropped 7.4% at the end of July and was little changed in the first week of August, finally showed a significant gain, rising 5.5% this week. The week's largest losses were in cotton, off 8.7%, and coffee, down 4.8%. Metals were all lower, led by silver, which dropped 2.6%.

Although not one of the assets I track weekly, it is worth noting that uranium ended July by setting a new all-time low of 0.59 g/lb. (My data goes back to 1988.) Is this the time to buy? Or is it the time to sell? And in either case, what's the best way to do so? I'm working on a report now that will give my answers to these questions.

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